Non-Prosecution Agreement German

Non-Prosecution Agreement (NPA) is a legal agreement between the government and a company or an individual. NPAs are commonly used in the United States to resolve legal disputes without going to court. NPAs are also used in Germany as an alternative to criminal prosecution.

In Germany, a Non-Prosecution Agreement is called „Verständigung” or „Deal.” The German criminal procedure law allows prosecutors to enter into a deal with defendants, which includes an admission of guilt and a penalty. The agreement is then presented to the court for approval. If the court approves the agreement, the defendant is not prosecuted.

The use of Non-Prosecution Agreements in Germany has been criticized by some legal experts. They argue that the use of NPAs undermines the principles of the rule of law and the right to a fair trial. However, supporters argue that NPAs are a useful tool for resolving criminal cases in an efficient and timely manner.

In recent years, there have been several high-profile cases in Germany that have involved Non-Prosecution Agreements. One of the most notable cases was the Volkswagen emissions scandal. In 2018, Volkswagen agreed to pay a €1 billion fine and entered into a Non-Prosecution Agreement with German prosecutors. The NPA allowed Volkswagen to avoid criminal prosecution in relation to the emissions scandal.

Another high-profile case was the bribery scandal involving Siemens AG. In 2008, Siemens entered into a Non-Prosecution Agreement with German prosecutors in which the company agreed to pay a fine of €1 billion. The NPA allowed Siemens to avoid criminal prosecution for its involvement in a bribery scandal that had spanned several years.

In conclusion, Non-Prosecution Agreements are a controversial but useful legal tool in Germany. While some legal experts argue that NPAs undermine the principles of the rule of law, supporters argue that they are a useful tool for resolving criminal cases in an efficient and timely manner. As with any legal tool, it is important to strike a balance between efficiency and fairness in their use.